Flooring: What You Actually Want Underfoot

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When it comes to flooring, traditional homes tend to mirror one another. Kitchens and bathrooms get tile, living rooms and bedrooms get carpet, then perhaps the dining room gets hardwood. But when you get into custom homes, anything is game. People have all sorts of aesthetics and preferences when it comes to what goes under their feet. Here are just a few of our favorites here at Classique Builders:

Solid Hardwood

THE APPEAL
Hardwood flooring is known for its durability. It can be sanded and refinished over and over again during its lifetime and is easy to clean. This, coupled with hardwood’s aesthetically pleasing nature, makes it one of the popular forms of flooring around.

 

THE DRAWBACK
Here in Durango at least, our dryer climate causes some unwanted changes to occur. It’s not uncommon for people out here to find gaps in between shrinking floorboards after a few years of home ownership. The “raisin effect” has people turning to other alternatives such as Engineered Wood.

Carpet

THE APPEAL
While carpet may be falling out of style for some, it is still the reigning champ for bedrooms. Kids can roll around on it and early risers can shuffle their bare feet on it without getting cold. There is just something nostalgic about carpet. With so many new types out there though, you can still get contemporary with it.

 

THE DRAWBACK
Carpets attract stains like bees to a flower. You know this truth all too well if you have children. Stains can obviously be removed. But that may be too time-consuming for people constantly on the go. A far more low-maintenance alternative could be Tile.

Bamboo

THE APPEAL
Bamboo flooring is being heralded as one of the most eco-friendly and durable flooring choices out there. Its clean lines and fresh feel make it a minimalist favorite. Strand bamboo is twice as hard as oak and is produced by compressing bamboo fibers under extreme heat & pressure.
THE DRAWBACK
While it is very durable, bamboo is still an organic product. It’s susceptible to potential water damage, discoloration, and even mold if improperly installed. It also has less variety in terms of color and texture than the flooring options above.

Engineered Wood

THE APPEAL
This flooring is often mistaken for the real thing. The veneer is real wood and it can vary in thickness. Beneath the veneer is (most commonly) a plywood or fibreboard core. Engineered wood is far more resistant to swelling and shrinking due to climate. This, factored in with its relatively easy install and durability, makes it a great choice for any room.

 

THE DRAWBACK
Depending on the quality of Engineered Wood you get, you may only get to sand and refinish it once or twice (as compared to many times over). This type of wood is also prone to twisting and bending over time.

Tile

THE APPEAL
Tile just has that touch of class a room needs in order in pop. It’s one of the most durable types of flooring on the market. So it makes sense why you see it in so many high foot-traffic areas such as kitchens and bathrooms. It is easily cleaned and can be replaced if cracked or chipped.
THE DRAWBACK
Tile is cold and hard by nature, so it can feel uninviting to bare feet unless it’s heated. And the idea of heating tile floors may seem financially daunting to some. Lighter grouting tends to get discolored over time as well.

Cork

THE APPEAL
Cork flooring is unlike anything else. Like bamboo, cork is also sustainably made and harvested. It’s a great addition to a room with vaulted ceilings as it absorbs both the sounds of echoing steps and heat that may otherwise escape to the ceiling. Cork is naturally hypoallergenic and resistant to mold and mildew so it could be a great choice for bathrooms. Bumps and scraps either fill back in eventually (thanks to cork’s porous nature) or blend in with the unique look of this flooring.
THE DRAWBACK
Not for pet owners. Nails on cats and particularly larger dogs will puncture and ruin the floor almost immediately if the flooring you choose is of lower quality. Higher quality cork can range up to $9 a square foot. Cork also fades naturally in the sunlight over time, so replacing a single piece may be difficult to color match.